Timmy needed her! And just like that our faithful collie no longer felt the sting of the ice round her paws, or the frozen wind blowing through the woods. Instead, blood surged through her veins as instinct took command and she drove headlong back to the farmhouse in search of help, her small body throwing itself across the fields and over the old wooden fence in a single bound as she raced home for help.

Learning Chinese? At the Absolute Beginner level at Popup Chinese, our focus is on covering the basics of the Chinese language in a series of shows you can cover in any order. In today's episode, join Echo, Brendan and David as we talk about why Lassie never made it big in China, and then discuss an easy way to put your sentences into the Chinese equivalent of the future tense.
 said on
January 21, 2013
Aww... someone really knows how to choose photos.... @trevelyan

--Echo

[email protected]
 said on
January 22, 2013
"The Incredible Journey" is one (I think Disney) movie where a cat and dog travel a great distance to get home. "Milo and Otis" is somewhat similar. I can't think of one with a girl that had long hair, but "Lassie" was both an old black and white TV series, and a late 80s/early 90s TV series in color. As far as I know, Lassie never had to travel across the country to get home, but was more often saving "Timmy" or other family members from harm's way.
 said on
January 22, 2013
It's definitely Homeward Bound
 said on
January 22, 2013
So here are some questions I have that are actually related to the lesson instead of to Disney movies: Does the "__ yao ___ le" rule work when you put it in negative form, i.e., "Wo3 bu4 yao4 qu4 le" being "I will not go"? What's the difference between "Wo3 yao4 qu4 le" and "Wo3 hui4 qu4"? Are there different contexts in which you would use these, or are they fairly interchangeable? Thanks.

--Zhong Dao
 said on
January 23, 2013
@bamboo2020 & 齐丹,

I found the movie: http://movie.douban.com/subject/1294704/ . This was the one I was talking about: Lassie Come Home made in 1943.

To answer bamboo2020's question:

It's a very very good question! No, you can't use it in negative form. It's usually bu4 yao4 + a verb (no le), meaning someone doesn't want to do sth.

--Echo

[email protected]
 said on
January 23, 2013
@Echo - Looks like Brendan and I need to bone up on our Lassie films.
 said on
January 23, 2013
So what happens to Timmy?
 said on
January 23, 2013
@murrayjames,

掉到井里了。

--Echo

[email protected]
 said on
January 23, 2013
@Echo,

笑死我了。然后呢?莱西他们终于救了他吗?还是Timmy被井里的怪物吃掉了?
 said on
January 23, 2013
Echo watches weird movies.
 said on
January 24, 2013
@murrayjames & 齐丹,

哈哈,其实我也没看过这个电影... (Actually I haven't seen the movie) But I guess he's definitely rescued in the movie, not in our dialogue though....

--Echo

[email protected]
 said on
January 26, 2013
@murrayjames,

爆炸了 :(

--david
 said on
September 3, 2013
I remember the book "Lassie Come Home". Good British stuff. No Timmy and no well, though. :-)
 said on
July 6, 2014
Cannot view the podcast player?
 said on
October 25, 2014
Ten years later (not the band)…

could it be that the Canadian series "The Littlest Hobo" reached China? It involved a German Shepherd

that wandered across the country saving people and then went off into the sunset. It was widely syndicated internationally.

 said on
April 3, 2016
Concerning the 要。。。了 structure, now I am confused. I have a teacher who told me that you indeed needed the 了 for the futur tense. But now I have another one that is telling me that putting 了 at the end is wrong. For exemple:我要去中国了. She says that by putting 了 at the end you are also implying that you are FINALLY going to china, 了 only meaning a change of state,and that therefore, if you only want to say that you are going to china then it's only 我要去中国。But then how do you know that we are not saying I want to go to china? She is the kind of teacher that doesn't take discussion over something to well so I didn't push it, but is that true?

Sry for the long post, I unfortunately have no potatoe :(